Alzheimer's Care Requires Help.

You are not alone. We understand that when a loved one is diagnosed with this disease, it can be a very difficult time.

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Some Quick Facts:

  • Dementia is the second leading cause of death in Australian each year.
  • One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer’s dementia.
  • Dementia affects almost 50 million people worldwide, which is predicted to increase to 131.5 million people by 2050.
  • Currently an estimated 250 people are joining the population with dementia each day. The number of new cases of dementia is expected to increase to 318 people per day by 2025.
  • In 2016 dementia became the leading cause of death among Australian females, surpassing heart disease which has been the leading since the early 20th century
  • Dementia is the single greatest cause of disability in older Australians aged 65 years or older, and the third leading cause of disability burden overall.

Who gets Alzheimer’s and Why?

Developing Alzheimer’s disease is linked to a combination of factors, some of which can be controlled, others such as age and genetics, which cannot.

Like all types of dementia, Alzheimer’s is caused by brain cell death. It’s a neurodegenerative disease, meaning there is a progressive type of brain cell death that happens over a period of time and varies in every individual. The total size of the brain shrinks with the onset of Alzheimer’s, and as a result, the tissue has progressively fewer nerve cells and connections.

Comforts & Familiarity of Home

One of the most promising Alzheimer’s treatments is referred to as “environmental therapy.” Because Alzheimer’s causes people to lose recent memories while retaining distant memories, studies have shown that keeping people in familiar surroundings helps to support brain health and happier ageing.

We provide our services in the comfort of your home so you or your loved one can receive help in familiar surroundings and settings. Our in-home care service focuses on monitoring clients while they’re in their own homes where they are safe and at lower risk of wandering. Being in a familiar setting will also help orient and engage them as well as to evoke long-term memories.

Planning with Family Members

We focus on two aspects of Alzheimer’s care – the client and his or her family. In order to be sure our clients receive the highest quality of care and attention they deserve, we pair them with trained and experienced caregivers who are a wonderful fit in terms of both personality and interests.

This ensures that meaningful relationships can be built and consistency in care can be easily achieved.

Guidance for Family Members

Alzheimer’s disease affects our clients’ families equally as much as it does the individual with the condition. It is a challenging and often times frustrating disease, which is why we provide on-going supervision for your loved one.


Our care teams will design supervisory services ranging from three hours a day to 24 -hour care. We’ll also give you specific tips and continual guidance on how best to handle Alzheimer’s care in addition to educating your family and friends on what they should expect.

Learn more about our Alzheimer’s caregiving services here.

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